jtrhart

Posts Tagged ‘tim keller’

Tim Keller Speaks at Google Headquarters

In news on March 6, 2008 at 8:19 pm

Have a look.

Tim Keller Interview

In news on March 3, 2008 at 9:41 pm

First Things has an interview with Tim Keller. You can find the Bob Newhart skit he’s talking about here.

Tim Keller's The Reason For God on the Amazon Kindle

In theology on February 16, 2008 at 11:21 pm

Amazon KindleSo, I’ve been evaluating the Amazon Kindle for a few days now. I will write a full review as soon as I have a better feel for it and after I use it in church services and Bible studies, but…it is awesome so far, much better than I was thinking it was going to be. Anyways, more to come.

One thing struck me last night, I looked for Tim Keller’s book for the Kindle on the 14th when it was released, but it was not available on the Kindle, only in hardcover form. But then I looked again last night and it was released! Then I also read the story of how the ESV was released for the Kindle. Basically, a few people commented that it would be nice to have the ESV translation on the Kindle and sure enough, Crossway released one.

My point in all this is that things seem to be moving much faster. Data is being produced in a form that allows it to be shared across all types of platforms without much difficulty. So, when I post something to my blog, I can share it on Digg, Facebook, etc. without having to tell each site what my data is and how it is formatted. In the same way, when a publisher creates a book, they can begin to publish it in many forms (hardcover, pdf, eReaders, etc.) without having to put a lot of effort into manipulating it.

So, I’m enjoying reading through my first book on the Kindle (The Reason For God). So far I like the book but I’ll wait until I’m finished before “passing judgment”. Once you figure out how to hold the device, you can lie down in bed and comfortably read through the book and actually forget that you’re reading an e-book. In just a few days I’ve gotten pretty fast at using the built-in highlighter and annotation tools on the Kindle so I’m still able to mark up the margins like I always do but now…I can search through my markings. This is one of the biggest selling points for the Kindle. Everything on it is searchable. Stay tuned for a full review once I’ve used it long enough!

A Tim Keller Valentine's Day

In books on February 15, 2008 at 5:21 pm

I have the best wife. Ever. Not because she bought me

The Reason For God

on the very day it came out. But because she knew to buy me that on the very day it came out. There is a big difference…

Anyways, I’ll certainly read through it in a few days but I won’t bother to review it, there are much wiser people out there that have reviewed it (read them here and here). What I’d really like to do is see if there is someone out there willing to read it along with me. The book’s subtitle is Belief in an Age of Skepticism, maybe you don’t believe but are interested in figuring out what this is all about. What do you think? Let me know if you’re interested.

More Tim Keller Sermons

In news on February 11, 2008 at 8:13 pm

Tim KellerI think just about everyone else on the web has posted these and I’m about 4 days late in doing so but, that’s ok. Reformissionary has posted some more free Tim Keller sermons, you can find them here. They are related to Dr. Keller’s book, The Reason for God, which is due out on February 14th. For some reason that date is a really easy one to remember and it’s been at the forefront of my mind ever since last year when they announced it.

Did Christianity get its religion from Egypt?

In news on February 10, 2008 at 8:48 pm

Here is an interesting article, no, I’ve never heard of the Jamaica Gleaner News either, but the content caught my eye and it’s very informative. The article attempts to show that some big differences between ancient Egyptian religions and Judeo-Christianity prove that Judaism and Christianity did not derive itself from these religions in Egypt.

There has always been discussion of the actual source of the Jewish religion and the Christian religion. This is an obvious question to ask when you look at some of the similarities between different religions. For instance, the Bible teaches that we should love our neighbor as ourselves (Leviticus 19:18), this same principle is also taught in Hinduism. The logic goes, if two religions are similar, one religion must have stemmed from another and hence did not come from God, therefore you can discount that religion since it is just a copy of another one. This argument is then taken further to say that all religions are the same so it doesn’t really matter what you believe, etc.

Actually, when you look at the command that we should love our neighbors as we love ourselves, you will find it in just about every major religion. So, when we look at the similarities and differences in the major religions, there is only one thing we can prove: The human condition is universal. Every human has looked at himself and the world he lived in and realized something was wrong. And every human has tried his best to fix it himself. Has anyone succeeded?

This is exactly what “religion” is. Religion is man’s attempt to fix his relationship with God. As Tim Keller puts it, “religion says I obey and therefore I am accepted by God.” So yes, you will find a lot of similarities when you look at what all the major religions teach, because all of them agree that there is sin and that if you stop people from sinning, things will be better. But what did Christ say? “apart from me you can do nothing” (John 15:5). Christianity is the only “religion” that teaches that we are “saved by grace through faith not as a result of works” (Ephesians 2:8-9). “God demonstrates his own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). Christ did not come “to call the righteous to faith, but the sinners” (Mark 2:17), this would be you, and me. The difference between Christianity and all other religions is not in how we’re commanded to be good and do good things, the difference is in how we restore our relationship to God. Tim Keller finishes off his statement with, “religion says I obey therefore I am accepted by God. Christianity says I am accepted through Christ therefore I obey.”

If you have an interest in getting a big picture look at the major religions, have a look at this book by Huston Smith.

Visiting Redeemer Presbyterian (Where Tim Keller Preaches)

In Uncategorized on January 7, 2008 at 9:17 am

I had to do some travel for work in NYC and figured since I had to be there Monday morning that I could drive up on Sunday and hear Tim Keller preach. I enjoy listening to Dr. Keller whenever I can, his sermons are more “practical” and topical than expository but he has a way of relating Scripture to everyday living that is (almost) universally relevant. He is very down to earth in his speaking and does a great job of explaining the human condition (sin) in a way that most people understand and relate to.

Redeemer Presbyterian Church was started back in 1989 after Dr. Keller moved to New York City to plant a church in the way Paul did; move to the biggest city in the area and start churches then let those churches spread to the areas surrounding the cities. One of Keller’s best-known quotes (it may not be his, but he sure uses it enough) is “as the city goes, so goes the culture”. And the idea is that the cities are the cultural/academic/artistic/etc. trend-setting sources for the entire world; if you can reform the people in the cities you will, in essence, be reforming the whole world.

So, after making the trek from Northern Virginia (which included my hourly rate in tolls and possibly getting two traffic tickets) I arrived at one of the three facilities that Redeemer meets in. Every weekend they hold five services in three different locations with Dr. Keller preaching at four of the five and a combined attendance of around 5,000 people.

The evening service that I attended incorporated jazz music during their corporate worship times, which was phenomenal; I enjoyed singing “All Hail the Power of Jesus’ Name” at three times the regular speed with a sax solo in the middle. The service itself is, well, Presbyterian. Which surprised me. I wasn’t expecting the liturgy, even if it was very minimal, found in a typical Presbyterian service (corporate reading/response of God’s Word, reading corporate prayers, reading the Apostles’ Creed, healing prayer/anointing with oil). I guess I just assumed that since this was a church in “the city” that they would not have these types of traditions. After singing, there were announcements and an offering was collected and then Tim Keller preached on the book of Job.

So, I can hear Tim Keller teach online by downloading his sermons, the reason I went to Redeemer was to see what this ministry looks like. How is the ministry team at Redeemer reaching out to the people of NYC and accomplishing what Dr. Keller’s goal is?

It’s a great approach. Tim Keller’s role is mainly as a teaching pastor. There are a lot of elders and deaconesses who are very active in the ministry. Obviously in a Sunday service this large, people cannot connect before/after the service so it’s the small groups and classes/events that bring the people closer. And this list is extremely extensive. This seems to be the way Redeemer has chosen to carry out its ministry. There is a meeting or small group or class for just about every profession and hobby you can find in the city. Business, the arts, advertising, lawyers, health care, entrepreneurs, actors, techies, financial, etc. are all represented. There are also classes on anger, finances, conflict,beauty & women’s issues, missions, bible studies, leadership training, church planting, etc. There are support/recovery groups, wide ranges of ways to serve and get involved, pastoral/elder care, short term missions projects, and the list goes on. This is a very large ministry and is well organized.

I wasn’t able to attend any of these groups, but if the leaders carry out their ministries in the way that Dr. Keller preaches, bringing the gospel to hurting people in a way that they can relate to, I would imagine they are very effective at accomplishing their mission statement, “To build a great city for all people – through a gospel movement that brings personal conversion community formation, social justice and cultural renewal to New York, and through it, to the world.”

I know it sounds like I’m reviewing a ministry like one would a book or movie and that is not my intent. I wanted to share what I learned about an effective ministry that is somewhat different than the types a guy from the ‘burbs is used to. I’m going to attend a service again with my wife on the way home next week so check back for more.